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32 posts from November 2006

November 30, 2006

Perils for Pedestrians Episode 110

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Perils for Pedestrians is a monthly series promoting awareness of issues affecting the safety of people who walk and bicycle. Perils For Pedestrians appears on public access cable stations in many cities across the United States.

We interview pedestrian and bicycling advocates and government planners about problems such as missing sidewalks and crosswalks, dangerous intersections, speeding traffic, and obstacles to wheelchair users and people with disabilities; and solutions to such problems.

Contents of Episode 110:
The Rails-to-Trails Conference; Minneapolis, MN
Bicycle engineering at Southern Illinois University; Edwardsville, IL
A bicycle advocate on bicycle education; Salt Lake City, UT
The RWJF active living partnership in Omaha, NE

lowell@steigerlaw.com

www.steigerlaw.com

Perils for Pedestrians Episode 105: Dublin, Velo-City 2005

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Velo-City conference series; Velo-City 2005, Dublin, Ireland; Dublin Cycling Campaign; National Policies to Promote Cycling; Bicycle Workshops in Rome. Perils for Pedestrians is a monthly series promoting awareness of issues affecting the safety of people who walk and bicycle. Perils For Pedestrians appears on public access cable stations in many cities across the United States and on DISH Network 9411 - The Universityhouse Channel.

We interview pedestrian and bicycling advocates and government planners about problems such as missing sidewalks and crosswalks, dangerous intersections, speeding traffic, and obstacles to wheelchair users and people with disabilities; and solutions to such problems.

lowell@steigerlaw.com

www.steigerlaw.com

November 29, 2006

Lawyer Jokes (New Entries)

Dear Readers,

I, for one, think it's healthy to laugh at oneself.  Please feel free to add more jokes under the "comments" section of this posting.

Lowell

lowell@steigerlaw.com

www.steigerlaw.com

The Lawyer and the Barber

A barber gave a haircut to a priest one day. The priest tried to pay for the haircut, but the barber refused, saying, "you do God’s work." The next morning the barber found a dozen bibles at the door to his shop.

A policeman came to the barber for a haircut, and again the barber refused payment, saying, "you protect the public." The next morning the barber found a dozen doughnuts at the door to his shop.

A lawyer came to the barber for a haircut, and again the barber refused payment, saying, "you serve the justice system." The next morning the barber found a dozen lawyers waiting for a free haircut.

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That's a Real Bargain

A Dublin lawyer died in poverty, and many people donated to a fund for his funeral. The Lord Chief Justice of Orbury was asked to donate a shilling. "Only a shilling?" said the Justice, "Only a shilling to bury an attorney? Here's a guinea; go and bury twenty more of them."

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Published in the Salt Lake Tribune (allegedly from real court transcripts)

Now doctor, isn't it true that when a person dies in his sleep, in most cases he just passes quietly away and doesn't know anything about it until the next morning?

Q: What happened then?
A: He told me, he says, "I have to kill you because you can identify me."
Q: Did he kill you?

Was it you or your brother that was killed in the war?

The youngest son, the 20-year-old, how old is he?

Q: She had three children, right?
A: Yes.
Q: How many were boys?
A: None.
Q: Were there any girls?

Were you alone or by yourself?

Q: I show you Exhibit 3 and ask you if you recognize that picture?
A: That's me.
Q: Were you present when that picture was taken?

Were you present in court this morning when you were sworn in?

Q: You say that the stairs went down to the basement?
A: Yes.
Q: And these stairs, did they go up also?

Q: Now then, Mrs. Johnson, how was your first marriage terminated?
A: By death.
Q: And by whose death was it terminated?

Q: Do you know how far pregnant you are now?
A: I'll be three months on March 12th.
Q: Apparently then, the date of conception was around January 12th?
A: Yes.
Q: What were you doing at that time?

Do you have any children or anything of that kind?

Was that the same nose you broke as a child?

Q: Mrs. Jones, do you believe you are emotionally stable?
A: I used to be.
Q: How many times have you committed suicide?

So, you were gone until you returned?

You don't know what it was, and you didn't know what it looked like, but can you describe it?

Q: Have you lived in this town all your life?
A: Not yet.

A Texas attorney, realizing he was on the verge of unleashing a stupid question, interrupted himself and said, "Your Honor, I'd like to strike the next question."

Q: Do you recall approximately the time that you examined that body of Mr. Huntington at St. Mary's Hospital?
A: It was in the evening. The autopsy started about 5:30 P.M.
Q: And Mr. Huntington was dead at the time, is that correct?
A: No, you idiot, he was sitting on the table wondering why I was performing an autopsy on him!

lowell@steigerlaw.com

www.steigerlaw.com

November 28, 2006

When Your Teen Starts to Drive

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August 2006 (Medialink) - It's the day many parents anticipate with nervous energy - the day their teen gets behind the wheel on their own for the first time.

According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, the crash rate per mile driven by 16 to 19 year olds is four times that of older drivers. As a result, every year more than 5,000 teen deaths occur from car crashes.

There are steps parents can take to make their teen a safer driver. A car is not a toy and it's important to reinforce that a vehicle is for transportation, not for social enjoyment. Also, teens should know the dangers of becoming distracted by cell phones, stereos, and passengers.

While your auto insurance rates go up when you add your teen to your policy, there are things that will help keep the costs down. Many insurance companies offer "good student discounts" if the teen driver maintains a certain grade point average and there may be discounts for completing safety programs.

Produced for Allstate

lowell@steigerlaw.com

www.steigerlaw.com

Keeping Kids Healthy: Fire Safety

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How do you protect your family from fire in your house or apartment? You really CAN protect them – if you’re just willing to spend a few minutes a year getting it right! Learn what to do from our host, Dr. Winnie King, and a fire inspector who knows how to save kids’ lives. And live through the experience of a family who now knows just how important those few minutes of preparation can be.

Guests:

Nate W Gibbons - Fire Inspector, Connecticut Fire Department
Jim Lazarko & Leah Bytheway - couple whose house burned down

Tips:

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Teach your kids to stay away from fire, matches, candles, stoves.
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Fire is preventable!Start talking about what to do at a very young age to make fire safety a learned behavior.
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Make sure your family has a fire plan and then practice it during the day and at night.
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If you live in an apartment building, know the fire escape routes down the stairs. Memorize your way around the hallways in case it’s dark. You can blindfold your kids and turn this into a game to practice.
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When you leave your apartment, shut doors behind you to contain the fire but leave them unlocked for the fire department.
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Alert your neighbors
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Walk down the stairs
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Get below the fire and call 911
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Make sure you have: flashlights, working smoke detectors, easy access to exits.
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Smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors are essential. Change the batteries 2x a year, when you change the time on your clocks. Test the batteries weekly.

Resources:

US Fire Administration
www.Usfa.fema.gov
301-447-4000

lowell@steigerlaw.com

www.steigerlaw.com

Protecting Drivers From The Dark

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The end of daylight-saving time is just around the corner, making night-time driving more dangerous. In fact, more than 2,300 people die on U.S. highways each year because of insufficient lighting, or "over driving" headlights, according to researchers at the University of Michigan. Over driving headlights occurs when your headlights don't provide enough seeing distance down the road for the speed which you are driving at. Most experts believe the maximum safe speed with average low beams under most conditions is only about 45 miles per hour.

Fortunately, new lighting technologies are enhancing vehicle and pedestrian safety at night. Xenon lighting (or High Intensity Discharge) is one example. It provides up to twice as much light on the road, as well as on the sides of the road enabling the driver to see upcoming pedestrians. According to a recent survey by Harris Interactive Inc., Xenon headlamps ranked second in the top 10 advanced automotive technologies consumers would like to purchase for their next vehicle.

This lighting comes standard on some cars and uses approximately 25 percent less power than traditional halogen headlights. For more information, viewers can go to: www.mvlc.info.

Produced for the Motor Vehicle Lighting Council

lowell@steigerlaw.com

www.steigerlaw.com

Physical Therapist Assistants and What They Can Do For You

Helping people help themselves is the main goal of the Physical Therapy. Working under the supervision of Licensed Physical Therapists, assistants play an important part in the rehabiliation of accident victims,... Entry level job search and internships. http://www.collegerecruiter.com/

lowell@steigerlaw.com

www.steigerlaw.com

Car Crash - Wear Your Seatbelt!

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This is why you should always wear your seatbelt.

lowell@steigerlaw.com

www.steigerlaw.com

November 22, 2006

Be Vigilant - Watch Out For Motorcycles, Save Lives

Safety video from NY State DMV, shows a driver turning in front of a biker. Excellent video. Watch what happens in a millisecond when a driver doesn't pay attention.

lowell@steigerlaw.com

www.steigerlaw.com

November 21, 2006

Child Passenger Safety - Please Watch: Very Informative

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Traffic crashes claim the lives of more than 43,000 people in this country each year. While most fatalities involve adults, more than one child dies each day in a traffic related crash. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that deaths and injuries among children could be reduced if parents would always buckle up their children in a child safety seat appropriate for their age and size. According to the NHTSA at least four of five children who should ride in booster seats do not. This segment underwritten by Nissan.

For More Information visit:
http://www.boosterseat.gov

lowell@steigerlaw.com

www.steigerlaw.com

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